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Sunday, February 26, 2017

A dialogue in Future Perfect

Posted by steve on August 21, 2013

Reflections on my experiences at this year’s Future Perfect festival that brings does and thinkers of sustainability together

Group

Arriving on the island

The Future Perfect Festival, held on the Stockholm archipelago Island of Grinda, wrapped up recently. The event, now in its third year, is designed to provide a space for those engaged emotionally and professionally in sustainability; a space where they can gather, engage in dialogue and co-create.

Future Perfect, the brainchild of John Manoochehri, is a unique kind of festival, and it is badly needed. Even if, like myself, you are engaged in sustainability on an almost daily basis, the topic is far too wide for any one mind to take in. We need to listen to each others perspective. If we as a species are going to successfully transition away from the present counter-sustainable culture we live in we need to do it together. This means talking, listening to each other, sparking ideas off each other, trying ideas out, coming up with ideas together, and developing our perspective by reflecting in the company of those who both agree and disagree with us.

To me it means engaging in double -loop learning. Single loop learning assesses the strategies being used by looking at outcome and trying corrections and then assessing the outcome, trying new corrections and so on. Double-loop learning is to look at outcomes and assess assumptions behind strategies and the values of the outcomes. Just now there is, for example, a huge debate about economic growth. Instead of using the single loop mode of changing taxes, negative incentives to get off unemployment and tax breaks for corporations, the double-loop mode questions (for example) whether economic growth is desirable at all, and if there should not be a minimum wage paid to all regardless of if they work or not.

A fascinating comment on this topic came up in one of the evening debates: one speaker suggested that the transfer of money from one person to another is an expression of that person’s appreciation of the other, and that we did not want to see a reduction in economic transactions as that would mean a reduction in the love and appreciation each of us share.

Anyway, if we are going to have dialogues that move deeper into double loop mode, we need to get to know who we can talk to, and we need a space, even if it is just once a year, that facilitates that. The Future Perfect set-up manages to do just that always in a comfortable, open setting surrounded by the Swedish countryside looking its summer best.

Just a few moments after arriving I was plunged into a fascinating dialogue experience What do young people want? With Kim Jakobsson, Magnus Åkerlind who have toured Swedish Schools to engage youth in sustainability. The session was expertly facilitated by Per Hörberg from http://www.navigatororganisation.se/ and Gustav Elmberger http://www.samutveckling.se/ who got us to sit in a circle, and reflect on the idea that if we were all-powerful, what would we do to connect youth to sustainability.

The breadth and depth of ideas was impressive. It was great to be reminded that it’s is not the lack of solutions, tools or ideas that is stopping us creating the future we want, but the lack of concerted action.

Tom

JAK’s Tom Strömberg

After lunch it was my turn to participate in a panel meeting with representatives from JAK bank, including the bank’s ethics representative, Tom Strömberg. I represented the Swedish Transition movement. Transition is a network of people working locally to make their communities resilient to energy shortages, climate change and economic downturn. For me, when asked about local production and consumption I identified three good sustainable reasons to do it:

  1. The money stays in the community and goes around again, and jobs stay in the community. As money leaks out for the community, for example when you buy fossil fuel, jobs leak with them.
  2. Producing locally requires less transport and therefore the transport footprint is less
  3. Doing business with people you know is far different from doing business with strangers from far away: it builds community and community means resilience.

The other things is it is easier to get away from being just a consumer. We all need to be owners, producers and consumers.

It is in the dialogue that you develop your own arguments, and it is fascinating when you think something is self evident and you find yourself finding new ways to explain them. Take the issue of us always having traded with each other. We have had global trade for thousands of years. Would it not be better just create an app that trades everything all over the world? Not so fast. The heavy things in your life are also the basics: a roof over your head and food on the table and social cohesion: a community of 100 or more. The heavy things require fossil-fuel (and cooled) transport. The lighter things that you do not need everyday can of course much easier come from afar. Or heavy things that you only purchase seldom.

FuturePerfect convo

Space to book conversations

In my consulting I help with framing strategy that gives real value back to people and the environment while ensuring financial stability. I see how it is getting harder and harder to take on the leadership role, as the challenges mount. I think that the Future Perfect set-up is a good one for leaders. There are several things that Future Perfect does well.

  • It creates a space for dialogue. Not just the “mental space” but also the way the programme is organised and the physical meeting spaces encourage dialogue, structured and spontaneous.
  • It gets people excited about working on solutions together. Of course we live in a competitive business environment, but true cooperation between government, civic society and business is needed if we are to find ways forward.
  • It hosts dialogues well, bringing out the best in its speakers. Future Perfect has knack of identifying just the right speaker and combination of speakers to quickly get to the heart of the matter. And the dialogue forms they have been using and developing – including the quick presentation in the panel and the probing follow-up questions – are enlightening and stimulating to follow.
  • It brings people together. As guest speaker Internet Philosopher Alexander Bard said in an interview for the Web-TV channel that broadcast from the festival “I like to see other people involved in the ecological to movement to discuss how we can avoid disaster”.

In grammar, Future Perfect is the name of the tense that I usually explain as “standing in the future looking back”. In English it is expressed in the form of (point in time) + (actor) will have +(event expressed in past tense). This is my “future perfect statement”: In 2030, society will no longer use fossil fuels or emit greenhouse gasses. Future Perfect will have made a pivotal contribution; it will have brought us together and will have helped us have those difficult reflections and conversations that gave us insight and resolve to make the change. What Future Perfect statement would YOU like to make?

Links:

Future Perfect

JAK Bank

Transition Movement

FuturePerfect convo

 

Complementary Currency Trial Shows How Communities Can Prosper

Posted by steve on August 1, 2013

Journalist BirGitta Tornerhielm shows off her vouchers for ITK

Journalist BirGitta Tornerhielm shows off her vouchers for ITK

A summary of the recent trial in Sweden, published at Resilience.org ,  presents a hopeful development with complementary currency as a driver of community development.

As economies fail throughout Europe it is becoming clearer that communities should come together to provide the security and safety that neither businesses or local authorities have the capability to provide. Rather than driving globalisation, the money system should  encourage these communities to become more self-reliant and resilient. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Transition movement meets the Circle Way at Camp

Posted by steve on July 31, 2013

Leading the dance

Manitonquat leads the dance

Back in July, participants from Sweden and Denmark gathered for the annual Circle Way camp hosted by Manitonquat, a Native American who bases his teachings on traditional tribal ways.

The camp, held at the Mundekulla conference center, has been going for some 11 years now. This year for the first time they were joined by people from the Swedish Transition movement.

 TRIBES WORK  FOR RESILIENCE

There is a lot for Transitioners to gain from learning about these traditional ways as I discovered right from the opening ceremonies. Firstly, the whole meaning of forming a tribe and living in a tribe is to create security and safety for all members,  a good environment for the next generations to grow up in, and a way for the elders to pass on their wisdom.

To me it makes a lot of sense; it is about resilience. A group of people who are organised, supportive, open and warm will be able to handle a lot of the challenges thrown at them, far better than each individually, especially if the talents and gifts (as well s the experience) of each member can be put to good use.

With each individual contributing to their full, the tribe will make good decisions, create a warm and supportive atmosphere, and build a place to grow up and thrive in.

It’s all about love and appreciation

Apart from resilience, one thing that struck me is the focus on love and appreciation that lies at the core of the old ways. I remember many of my first meetings with the Transition movement; they all started with people turning to each other expressing what they appreciated about where they lived, food, holidays etc. It always gave the right frame to start the meetings off. And Appreciative Inquiry, the problem-solving method based on looking at what is working uses the same frame of mind. Manitonquat takes it one step further. He uses the idea of humans as being a unique “mothers and others” creatures. Because of the long time it takes to reach adulthood, and the amount of attention and care needed, human children’s needs extend far beyond what two parents can provide. The child needs the tribe to grow up.

 For humans to evolve, we need a lot of contact with children

And, according to Manitonquat, it is a two way street: for us adults to grow, we need the connection with children, they challenge us to find out hearts and our love, and to open up to continue our own growth. Appreciation, love, compassion, so much a part of the human experience, are all brought out in us by children. And in that mode we become creative and generous, the energies needed to evolve humankind.

So much of the customs and practices we learned at the Camp have to do with personal growth: creating a secure and safe environment, creating a space that invites the peace everyone longs for into their lives, putting everyone’s talents and gifts to good use, and securing the community for the next generation.

IT IS A PERMACULTURE APPROACH

Standing in the ceremonies and listening to Manitonquat I got the strong feeling that I was experiencing a permaculture approach to creating a healthy and healing culture: you design practices and customs to support that culture, and you take good care of them. Just as the design for food provision gives food security, the design for cohesion brings security to every member from a social point of view. It is easy to brush off traditions and ceremonies as being artifacts from a less developed past that are just, like the appendix, hanging around with no real function. Not so from a North American Indian view: they are the very tools of survival.

IS SO DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE

So, how do you actually go about bringing people together to form the tribe? Manitonquat says that in all living things there must be some kind of original instructions. And that finding a resonance with these instructions is something that every human being can do. If we just get started, we might let our intuition guide us.

It all starts by standing in a circle and holding hands. Looking around at the people present to see them and having everyone expressing their shared intention and appreciation of that which we resonate with. We did it several times during the camp and it always felt good. It is deceptively simple, but it needs to be done in a sincere way, and with sensitivity to all the people present.

I was reminded again how similar it was to the way we start Transition information meetings, where we get people to share their favourite place or food or holiday spot, to remind attendees that we come from a place where we want to preserve the Earth for ourselves to appreciate and enjoy and to hand it on to others.

 LISTENING BUILDS RESILIENCE

The practices Manitonquat teach contain a lot of powerful techniques of listening, I would say on par or maybe better than those taught on top leadership and counselling courses. Again, deceptively simple. In the resilient community, when going through tough changes, everyone needs emotional support. With a whole tribe armed with a sincere wish to help and powerful techniques it is just to grab the person of your choice and get going!

Being listened to, unconditionally like that was for me actually a wonderful experience. I have been through a pretty tough past six months and hadn’t realised just how much it had been dragging me down until I got the chance to participate in the session where I got heard and listened to, as one of the techniques is called, actively.

Another similar approach they use is called “discharging”. You give the other person 10 minutes (enough to express, not enough to burden the listener) to express the difficult, negative feelings and emotions they are carrying, and then you get to swap roles.

Just the efficacy of this practice is born out by academic research: in one experiment, hospital patients who spent 20 minutes writing about difficult emotional issues healed faster than the control group who did not express in that way. Follow this link.

 

YOU NEED A CLAN AND A TRIBE

Let me just explain this bit about the ideal size of a community: our temporary “tribe” was about 70 people including children (who were, by the way always welcome to take part in the common activities). I think the ideal tribe size is larger, I should guess that it needs to be no larger than you can hear everyone’s voice when sitting in a circle, and no larger than everyone can make a contribution. But to make it work you need smaller groups too. We divided into clans of 5-6, to not only take on some of the practical tasks needed to be done at the camp but to also create a support group. I guess in native practices one of the clans you belong to is through blood relations. Anyway, our clan was there to be supportive in listening and we had several sessions where we just got the opportunity to talk and be listened to.

It sounds simple, it is, but done with sensitivity I believe a clan approach as a support group could be useful to Transitioners or any community. Being a human in this modern world, in these challenging times is not easy. Having someone to talk to like that is truly valuable, and healing.

PLAYFUL, TOO

Manitonquat was saying how they always had a ceremonial clown. Part of the whole thing is not to take yourself too seriously. In fact, doing a good job of making a bit of a fool of yourself is highly encouraged. One evening we had an “open stage” session where each clan did a skit. Mostly humorous, sometimes profound it reminded me of how much your own home grown entertainment is thousands of times better than that you see manufactured for television!

TRANSITION IS ALSO ABOUT DESIGNING THE CULTURE YOU WANT

I had the opportunity together with Pella Thiel to run a session to introduce the Transition movement. We did a few “mapping” exercises where people stand physically in the room relative to where they live. It felt right to talk about the compass directions. As we saw later, traditional native practices are infused with a sense of North, South East West literally and figuratively. Then we talked about the oil, climate, money and social challenges we see and how we are responding at a local level.

THE STORIES WE TELL ARE FORMING OUR CULTURE

As I was talking about oil I felt a sense of being a story teller. Manitonquat has another name: Medicine Story, and he IS a great story teller. In the North American Indian tradition stories are enlightening and healing, they are educational and entertaining. Just as working with a sense of space and direction gives us orientation, stories help orient us in time. Maybe that is why children like to hear the same story, and maybe why I am still drawn to the drama of the oil story.

That is another thing I take away from the camp: the importance of telling the Transition story in a way that gives an orientation and a sense of time.

We got a lot of good feedback from participants who had not yet heard of Transition. They saw a way they could connect with people locally to invite them to circles and for themselves to get involved in the practical side of creating the culture they wanted.

PARTING AS FRIENDS

I loved the final parting ceremonies, from singing a “goodbye, see you again” song to dancing in a long line past each other, giving a little “nod” of recognition and thanks for the time together, the circle sharing of what we most appreciated and what we take with us to use in our own community.

 FIND OUT MORE

Highly recommended are Manitonquat ‘s books on Amazon (link) and his website if you would like to attend a camp.

 TAKING IT ONE STEP FURTHER

I left feeling inspired to see what I can do in my own community, my family and Transition groups to apply the insight and wisdom from the camp. I considered introducing a few activities in a way that suits the group and Swedish culture. The Viking culture had something called a “round” where everyone got the chance to speak, rather like the talking stick of the Native Americans. That works well even when introduced to people new to the idea of community.

I really appreciated the way the camp was outdoors a lot and integrated with the children. The kids had a lot of space to play and run around, they had their parents close by, but it was more than just a camping holiday because of all the activities. Something to build on, at least for the few months the Swedish climate allows it.

 

REFLECTION: CAN RETURNING TO TRIBES BE PART OF A GLOBAL EVOLUTION?

In his recently-released talk, Robert Gilman of the Context Institute argues that we have a new freedon to evolve. We are so highly connected (75% of the world population have access to a mobile phone) and highly mobile, we could evolve from being stuck in our immediate groups (town, corporation) to move into new, consensual groupings in new forms of cooperation. Certainly, adopting and buidling on the old ways, combining with new forms of social enterprise could form the foundation of the transition to the healthy, healing culture we long to be part of.

 

 

 

 

Experimental currency in Sweden

Posted by steve on July 1, 2013

Does your local community need and injection of money to usher in prosperity? No worry, just get your scissors out and make some! This is anyway what a group of local community developers in Sweden are trying. The initiative is a cooperation between Transition Towns in Sweden (the organization that works on a local level to prepare for a world without oil) and ISSS, the Institute of Swedish Safety and Security – an organization that is working to promote resilience and disaster preparedness.

Philip Wyer, chairman of ISSS, the project’s lead partner, explains that the role of his institute is to study the changes occurring in society and relate them to the safety, security and well-being of people. Understanding resilience and ways for society to show resilience in the face of change is a perspective that ISSS covers with the other partners, the Swedish Transition movement and Open World Villages. Most important is to understand the risks society might face and ways to mitigate those potential threats. Philip likens it to preparing for a journey: you cannot be sure of what to take with you until you know if the journey will be along smooth roads, in hot jungle or up freezing mountains. Having understood where you will be going, i.e. what situation society will be in, the analysis, assessment and recommendations follow, utilizing tools including R.A.I.D assessments. This acronym stands for risks, assumptions, issues and dependencies, which enable the organization to understand the current perspective on a potential scenario and analyze the effect of future changes. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

New book shows the Power of Just Doing Stuff

Posted by steve on June 23, 2013

Recently published by Transition Towns founder Rob Hopkins, this new book “The Power of Doing Stuff” encourages everyone to engage with the food security challenge as well as resilience in general.

You can be a part of the change by engaging locally wherever you live. Around the world, people are seeing the limits – of carbon dioxide, energy availability and economic growth – as opportunities. They are not waiting for permission. They are coming together to create more stronger, more resilient communities.

The power of just doing stuff is one of the big ideas of our time. See the video, buy the book! Click on this link The Power of Just Doing Stuff: How Local Action Can Change the World.

Swedish Foundation sees fees on raw materials can create circular economy

Posted by steve on June 16, 2013

Product_matrixJust released, the latest version of the Swedish Sustainable Economy Foundation’s White paper presents in detail how nations can usher in the zero emission, no waste society using a special fee mechanism on raw materials. Download the paper from the Foundation’s web site

 People get worried that we should reduce consumerism, as our way of life is driving resource use and emissions. Just reducing will collapse the economy. Instead, the Foundation proposes fees on introduction of raw materials into the economy.  These fees are raised until the consumption and emission of materials ceases. But the money is redirected into  the economy – paid out equally to all taxpayers. This ensures people have money to buy what they need.

The paper is the result of several years’ work, including projects with the Nordic Council of Ministers on Carbon fees and fees on phosphorous and nitrogen.

It is essential reading for those working with the transition of society away from the resource-hungry to the equitable, sustainable future many long for. It provides a sound basis for practical approaches to pricing and managing pollution.

The paper, along with other versions and  the short summary can be downloaded here.

http://tssef.se/?p=605

The circular economy can be ushered this way: substances that are not biological of origin ( iron, other metals,  mined substances etc) cost to enter the system, and the price is raised until they do not leave it. Biological nutrients circulate too, but enter and leave the economy without burdening recipient or reducing ecological maturity of the source. At the same time, money to enable these transactions circulates freely in the opposite direction.

 

Stephen Hinton speaks at Copenhagen Business School on how business can address food security

Posted by steve on June 13, 2013

Stephen Hinton will address students and guests at Copenhagen Business School on the 19th June. A fellow of the ISSS, Stephen has been supporting the Humanitarian Water and Food Award (WAF) with selecting applicants.

In collaboration with WAF, Copenhagen School of Entrepreneurship is inviting to CSR 2.0 conference: “Water and food for all – A challenge of business thinking and the general assembly of the humanitarian food and water award.”

Stephen will speak from his experience of selecting applicants for the awards from the 100s of leading –edge initiatives from around the world. And he will present what he sees as the opportunities for businesses to play their part in creating a new, resilient and sustainable prosperity that feeds everyone, takes care of the planet and houses thriving businesses.

Find out more about the event here.

Find out more about the Water and Food Award here.

Based in Stockholm, Sweden The Institute of Swedish Safety & Security (ISSS), is a registered non-profit institution. Founded in 2010 by individuals committed to working towards a peaceful, safe and secure environment, members have significant and diverse backgrounds from security risk management consultancy, law enforcement, intelligence, military, government, Counter Terrorism Units and ‘Special Forces’.

The institute provides both research and an advisory capacity in risk management and crisis preparedness to stimulate sustainable living, resilience and ensure the well-being of communities. The mandate aims to bring awareness to lead to the development of enhanced processes to ensure the integrity of critical and second tier assets during the event of natural / man-made crisis, disasters or act of terrorism in addition to potential ripple effects from conflicts in the global arena and, therefore, promote resilience through preparedness.

Where we need innovation: the economic system

Posted by steve on May 27, 2013

TAXESThe present economic system is a patchwork of taxes and subsidies and ideas that have been around since at least the 1800s. Tax upon tax has been added trying to bring control and equality to the system.

The picture here shows just the CATEGORIES of transactions involved and then just the most common. If we are going to create a sustainable way of life, to transform to where we need to go to ensure food and water and a roof for all, we need to make some sweeping changes.

Looking at it like this, it  may not be too  difficult: We could start by not allowing any poisoning of the commons, and planning a fast phase-out of externalisation in all forms.  Putting a tax on what we don’t want, and making the things we do cheap is another strategy.

Trying to be sustainable without reforming the economic system is probably a waste of time, as it presents a compact wall of resistance to any move to sustainability. And it is so complex no-one seems to have a clear of idea of how it works anyway!

 

READ MORE

Webinar on flexible emission fee mechanisms

White paper on externalisation

 

Transitioning away from fossil fuel: society is like an amoeba.

Posted by steve on May 19, 2013

I spent a pleasant afternoon in the Swedish Town of Uppsala with the Upplandsbygd regional development organization and people involved in the Transition Towns movement from Sweden (Uppsala) and Scotland( the town of Fores) in a workshop that looked towards both regions’ development up to 2020.

The workshop was organized as part of a cooperation to, among other things, help improve the results of local efforts towards Transition and local food. (Transition Towns is a local action movement aiming to create communities that are resilient to challenges coming from the expected shortfalls in fossil fuel provision as well as disruptions like drastic economic downturn.)

After a few exercises to get to know each other a bit better, we turned to telling each other stories of what has worked for us, and what has moved us.

 

The Fores community garden brought people together

The Fores community garden brought people together

mending and making things  together has given the community  a lot back

Mending and making things together has given the community a lot more back than just things

The caption

One person found out about Peak oil from one of the original Innovators, Colin Campbell and went ahead to start a Transition Group locally

We then heard from one of the cooperating partners, the Institute of Swedish Safety and Security. Chairman Philip Wyer presented the Safety and Security Industry view of developments and their relation to local and regional development. We will publish an account of this presentation shortly. (See more information at the end of this article)

We then went on to think about the society we would like to see in 2020, looking at food, housing, energy and transport, and culture.

You can see the results below.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

The dream is creating housing for all, energy efficient and adapted to climate and landscape.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

Developing a culture of inclusion, healthy and healing

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

Locally -grown food, and a fair wage to farmers.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

Politics that reflect protection of the environment. Sustainable production should be economically viable.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

More electric transport and reduction of transport demand by, e.g. local food production.

 

Following on from that we looked at how the societal change might come about, using Alan AtKissons model of the Amoeba. It feels like a relevant model for Transition, and has been tried by a few groups earlier.

amoeba
Basically, the model says that social change is like an amoeba. To move (change) the amoeba puts out a small “foot” and then the rest of the amoeba follows after. The model says that there are different types of people who are important to change, and we looked at some of the major categories:
• Innovators, at the edge, coming with the new insights
• Change agents, first into the “foot”, able to convey the message of the innovators in an understandable and compelling way
• Transformers, showing leadership of groups, able to mobilize their energy
• Mainstreamers, the ordinary person who will come along when everyone else seems to be
• Reactionaries, who are invested in NOT changing
• Laggards who will resist until the last minute, but do not want to be left behind.

In a form of constellation exercise we talked out way through some of the roles. In Transitioning away from the fossil fuel dependent society, Peak Oil experts, Local Economic development innovators, Climate experts, as well as visionaries like the Occupy movement and especially the people working with alternatives to economic growth are all innovating on this edge.
Interestingly, Uppsala is the home of the Uppsala University department where Swedish Peak oil expert professor Kjell Aleklett works. Despite his academic standing he has largely been ignored in his own country, like many other innovators.

We saw how Transition founder Rob Hopkins, has acted in many ways as a change agent. His folksy popular way of talking about Transition has brought the idea down further to the ordinary person. Rob has been able to put the narrative together of both climate change, peak oil, and the “planet care, people care, fair share” ideal of Permaculture in a way that appeals to many.

However, Transformers are needed too. In Scotland and in Sweden, several individuals have started local Transition Initiatives together, forming core groups to bring in others to support further development.

Our conversation turned to thinking about how to get more mainstreamers on board. Transition in Fores had just got a community center, and were arranging informal meetings and I believe a party was planned. We realized that mainstreamers go to things when their friends go, so this maybe gives us a clue, that if there is a good energy around gatherings, people will go with their friends. Having something to show increase attractive as does anything around food. (If you offer free food, Swedes will come, someone said.) The subtlety of being appealing to the masses was very interesting to explore. Good energy and respect were like magnets, but low energy and stress held people away.

No deep revelations here, but it was an interesting exercise, I suspect the insights will continue to work in the back of my mind. A big thanks to all the Transitioners who joined in and the arrangers, RUCOP and ISSS.

More information

The Transition Movement

Transition Sweden

The AtKisson Amoeba model

ISSS

RUCOP

 

From the Charles Eisenstein event

Posted by steve on May 18, 2013

  1. Last night’s event with Charles Eisenstein was like listening to a spellbinding story teller, the story of the old story and the story of the new emerging. I twittered like mad until my battery ran out. Here are the tweets unedited.

     

    #ceisenstein disrupt the old story with love and kindness; miracles happen when you come in the flow

  2. #ceisenstein change agents can offer experience of new story: connection, love, acceptance

     #ceisenstein now age of gifts. Leaders hold the story. Leaders encourage all to give gifts.
  3.  #ceisenstein sees mans exponential growth as childhood. Painful passage of rites ahead as we go to adulthood.
  4.  #ceisenstein money no longer created as debt would see universal basic income
  5.  #ceisenstein new story is give of your gifts all have gifts to give

  6. #ceisenstein despair and powerlessness built in to story.
  7. #ceisenstein activism coming together with spiritualism. See occupy!
  8. #ceisenstein impulse of heart validates acts against logic of mind.

  9. #ceisenstein the NEW story is no force no separation but validation of kindness
  10. #ceisenstein at the root of our current deep crisis is the mythology our institutions rest on. Separation % force
  11.  #ceisenstein I found where we get our ideas about what is possible comes from institutions that create the misery.
  12. #ceisenstein my optimism is not from ignorance of all negative in world.
  13. #ceisenstein economic growth merely about more services paid for not measure of development.
  14. Full house at #ceisensteinhttp://instagram.com/p/Za3Rx-Pu0q/ 
  15. #ceisenstein Hopi saying: we are the ones we have been waiting for
  16. #ceisenstein event kicks off with rousing song