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Sunday, March 1, 2015

What I do

Posted by steve on January 3, 2011

This blog presents my work envisioning sustainable living arrangements for cities and rural areas. I also work with alternative financing strategies that support sustainable development.

As we are reaching the end of the industrial age, I believe we need  a positive vision of the future without abundant fossil fuel.  WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Capitalism explained

Posted by steve on January 18, 2015

 

Everybody talks about capitalism – but what is it? | Kajsa Ekis Ekman | TEDxAthens

Capitalism is production for profit in private hands according to Kajsa.

And ordinary people are stuck between asking employers for enough wages to pay their bills and banks who want enough money to pay their loans.

An introduction to the Flexible Pollutant Mechanism

Posted by steve on December 17, 2013

This short video explains the mechanism put forward by the Swedish Sustainable Economy Foundation for solving pollution with financial incentives.

Circular economy in diagrams: where logic breaks down and where financial incentives can work

Posted by steve on December 3, 2013

Are your circle economy diagrams confusing your audience? This article aims to help you communicate clearly. As a staunch aficionado of reaching a resilient economy through sustainability I am all for circle economy thinking- if it ensures people get food on the table and a roof over their heads. Unclear delivery will not help our cause. We talk of circle economy from two angles: economy as a form of housekeeping and economy in terms of monetary flows. These are not always the same thing. The final section suggests a solution.

fos1

WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

(In Swedish) Lokal Ekonomisk Utveckling

Posted by steve on November 3, 2013

För första gången på flera generationer verkar nästa generation komma att ha det mycket svårare än den föregående. Det har vuxit fram en insikt att det kanske inte planeras några räddningspaket från någon myndighet, utan att det är dags för vanliga människor att åstadkomma något själva. Redan nu poppar det upp lokala ekonomiska initiativ överallt. Enskilda initiativ har kanske ingen större betydelse, men tillsammans vävs en ny berättelse. Det börjar lokalt med en omställning till ett mer resilient, hållbart sätt att leva. En resilient hållbar lokalekonomi. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Strategic Newsletter Launches: September Edition 2013

Posted by steve on September 27, 2013

Signals of Change newsletter  monitors the news flow from a wide variety of sources from the last 30 – 60 days for developments that could inform your organization’s social and environmental strategy which in turn could affect your overall business strategy.  Signals of Change Newsletter is produced in  cooperation between the Open World Foundation, the Institute of Swedish Safety and Security and Stephen Hinton Consulting.

The newsletter is released once a month to subscribers only. (To subscribe and be fully up to date – it’s free – click here). The newsletter is released a few weeks later for public reading on partner websites. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Overshoot day August 20: will “economic” reality meet resource reality?

Posted by steve on September 22, 2013

Let us look at overshoot day from the point of view of economics. By economics I mean the technology of keeping track of housekeeping with resources and keeping track of material obligations to those around us.  Economics does not need to be restricted to counting with money. Other measures can be used. And it is fascinating to try it. In this case we can consider that a Nation has its own household that it needs to keep fed and housed, and has its natural resources to do it. We start with a situation however where many nations are living over their means. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Learning from the ECO-ISLANDS conference

Posted by steve on September 15, 2013

Bornholm2

One of the electric cars you rent with a simple text message

Arriving at this year’s ECO ISLANDS conference, held on the Danish Island of Bornholm, I wasn’t expecting it to feel like a Transition meeting. I was attending the conference to discuss things related to my day job – pollution taxes. I was delighted as the conference progressed to discover that many islands around the world are going through their own transition process, even if most of them hadn’t heard of Transition Towns. ECO ISLANDS is a network of Islands that have stated that they are aiming toward sustainability, by signing something called the Accord, a statement of intent that over 50 islands have already signed. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Shifting Power, Shifting Economy

Posted by steve on

Lindesberg1

Lindsberg Conference Center basking in the late summer sunshine

Lindsberg conference center, just outside the Swedish town of Falun, saw three days of Powershift Sweden with PUSH, a youth movement conference for action for a fossil-free society. As a fellow of ISSS (the Institute of Swedish Safety and Security) and one of the founders of Transition Sweden, I brought the complementary currency ITK to the seminar  as the conference’s volunteer currency. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

A dialogue in Future Perfect

Posted by steve on August 21, 2013

Reflections on my experiences at this year’s Future Perfect festival that brings does and thinkers of sustainability together

Group

Arriving on the island

The Future Perfect Festival, held on the Stockholm archipelago Island of Grinda, wrapped up recently. The event, now in its third year, is designed to provide a space for those engaged emotionally and professionally in sustainability; a space where they can gather, engage in dialogue and co-create.

Future Perfect, the brainchild of John Manoochehri, is a unique kind of festival, and it is badly needed. Even if, like myself, you are engaged in sustainability on an almost daily basis, the topic is far too wide for any one mind to take in. We need to listen to each others perspective. If we as a species are going to successfully transition away from the present counter-sustainable culture we live in we need to do it together. This means talking, listening to each other, sparking ideas off each other, trying ideas out, coming up with ideas together, and developing our perspective by reflecting in the company of those who both agree and disagree with us.

To me it means engaging in double -loop learning. Single loop learning assesses the strategies being used by looking at outcome and trying corrections and then assessing the outcome, trying new corrections and so on. Double-loop learning is to look at outcomes and assess assumptions behind strategies and the values of the outcomes. Just now there is, for example, a huge debate about economic growth. Instead of using the single loop mode of changing taxes, negative incentives to get off unemployment and tax breaks for corporations, the double-loop mode questions (for example) whether economic growth is desirable at all, and if there should not be a minimum wage paid to all regardless of if they work or not.

A fascinating comment on this topic came up in one of the evening debates: one speaker suggested that the transfer of money from one person to another is an expression of that person’s appreciation of the other, and that we did not want to see a reduction in economic transactions as that would mean a reduction in the love and appreciation each of us share.

Anyway, if we are going to have dialogues that move deeper into double loop mode, we need to get to know who we can talk to, and we need a space, even if it is just once a year, that facilitates that. The Future Perfect set-up manages to do just that always in a comfortable, open setting surrounded by the Swedish countryside looking its summer best.

Just a few moments after arriving I was plunged into a fascinating dialogue experience What do young people want? With Kim Jakobsson, Magnus Åkerlind who have toured Swedish Schools to engage youth in sustainability. The session was expertly facilitated by Per Hörberg from http://www.navigatororganisation.se/ and Gustav Elmberger http://www.samutveckling.se/ who got us to sit in a circle, and reflect on the idea that if we were all-powerful, what would we do to connect youth to sustainability.

The breadth and depth of ideas was impressive. It was great to be reminded that it’s is not the lack of solutions, tools or ideas that is stopping us creating the future we want, but the lack of concerted action.

Tom

JAK’s Tom Strömberg

After lunch it was my turn to participate in a panel meeting with representatives from JAK bank, including the bank’s ethics representative, Tom Strömberg. I represented the Swedish Transition movement. Transition is a network of people working locally to make their communities resilient to energy shortages, climate change and economic downturn. For me, when asked about local production and consumption I identified three good sustainable reasons to do it:

  1. The money stays in the community and goes around again, and jobs stay in the community. As money leaks out for the community, for example when you buy fossil fuel, jobs leak with them.
  2. Producing locally requires less transport and therefore the transport footprint is less
  3. Doing business with people you know is far different from doing business with strangers from far away: it builds community and community means resilience.

The other things is it is easier to get away from being just a consumer. We all need to be owners, producers and consumers.

It is in the dialogue that you develop your own arguments, and it is fascinating when you think something is self evident and you find yourself finding new ways to explain them. Take the issue of us always having traded with each other. We have had global trade for thousands of years. Would it not be better just create an app that trades everything all over the world? Not so fast. The heavy things in your life are also the basics: a roof over your head and food on the table and social cohesion: a community of 100 or more. The heavy things require fossil-fuel (and cooled) transport. The lighter things that you do not need everyday can of course much easier come from afar. Or heavy things that you only purchase seldom.

FuturePerfect convo

Space to book conversations

In my consulting I help with framing strategy that gives real value back to people and the environment while ensuring financial stability. I see how it is getting harder and harder to take on the leadership role, as the challenges mount. I think that the Future Perfect set-up is a good one for leaders. There are several things that Future Perfect does well.

  • It creates a space for dialogue. Not just the “mental space” but also the way the programme is organised and the physical meeting spaces encourage dialogue, structured and spontaneous.
  • It gets people excited about working on solutions together. Of course we live in a competitive business environment, but true cooperation between government, civic society and business is needed if we are to find ways forward.
  • It hosts dialogues well, bringing out the best in its speakers. Future Perfect has knack of identifying just the right speaker and combination of speakers to quickly get to the heart of the matter. And the dialogue forms they have been using and developing – including the quick presentation in the panel and the probing follow-up questions – are enlightening and stimulating to follow.
  • It brings people together. As guest speaker Internet Philosopher Alexander Bard said in an interview for the Web-TV channel that broadcast from the festival “I like to see other people involved in the ecological to movement to discuss how we can avoid disaster”.

In grammar, Future Perfect is the name of the tense that I usually explain as “standing in the future looking back”. In English it is expressed in the form of (point in time) + (actor) will have +(event expressed in past tense). This is my “future perfect statement”: In 2030, society will no longer use fossil fuels or emit greenhouse gasses. Future Perfect will have made a pivotal contribution; it will have brought us together and will have helped us have those difficult reflections and conversations that gave us insight and resolve to make the change. What Future Perfect statement would YOU like to make?

Links:

Future Perfect

JAK Bank

Transition Movement

FuturePerfect convo

 

Complementary Currency Trial Shows How Communities Can Prosper

Posted by steve on August 1, 2013

Journalist BirGitta Tornerhielm shows off her vouchers for ITK

Journalist BirGitta Tornerhielm shows off her vouchers for ITK

A summary of the recent trial in Sweden, published at Resilience.org ,  presents a hopeful development with complementary currency as a driver of community development.

As economies fail throughout Europe it is becoming clearer that communities should come together to provide the security and safety that neither businesses or local authorities have the capability to provide. Rather than driving globalisation, the money system should  encourage these communities to become more self-reliant and resilient. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »